Video

Recommended Videos that address PRC San Diego’s focus areas of activism: Poverty, Economic Justice, Race, (In)Equality, Immigration, Nationalism, Spirituality, Moralism, Militarism, Colonialism, Sovereignty, & Sustainability

Race, (In)Equality

Directed and co-produced by Palestinian actor Mohammad Bakri, Jenin Jenin includes testimony from Jenin residents after the Israeli army’s Defensive Wall operation. The city and camp were the scenes of fierce fighting which ended with Jenin flattened and scores of Palestinians dead. Palestinians as well as numerous human rights groups accused Israel of committing war crimes in the attack. The United Nations appointed a commission of inquiry, but Israel refused to let its members visit the scene.

Banned in Israel, Jenin Jenin is dedicated to Iyad Samudi, the producer of the film, who returned home to Yamun after the shooting of the film was completed. On June 23, as Israeli forces besieged Yamun, Samudi was shot and killed as he was leaving a militarily-closed area with three friends.\

Through riveting and moving personal recollections of both Palestinians and Israelis, 1948: Creation & Catastrophe reveals the shocking events of the most pivotal year in the most controversial conflict in the world. It tells the story of the establishment of Israel as seen through the eyes of the people who lived it. But rather than being a history lesson, this documentary is a primer for the present. It is simply not possible to make sense of what is happening today without an understanding of 1948. This documentary was the last chance for many of its Israeli and Palestinian characters to narrate their first-hand accounts of the creation of a state and the expulsion of a nation. Hear stories from the Israelis and Palestinians who personally lived through events in Haifa, Jaffa, Dayr Yasin, Acre, Jerusalem, Ramla, Lydda and more. These shocking and dramatic events reveal the core of what drives the conflict today.

Militarism, Colonialism, Sovereignty

Today the expenditure of billions of dollars every year on weapons acquired for the purpose of making sure we never need to use them is essential to keeping the peace. But surely the acquisition of such idle stockpiles–which can only destroy and never create–is not the only, much less the most efficient, means of assuring peace.

I speak of peace, therefore, as the necessary rational end of rational men. I realize that the pursuit of peace is not as dramatic as the pursuit of war–and frequently the words of the pursuer fall on deaf ears. But we have no more urgent task.

https://www.jfklibrary.org/archives/other-resources/john-f-kennedy-speeches/american-university-19630610

Arundhati Roy is tired. Tired of being who she is expected to be. Tired of being lauded and condemned in equal measure and at the same time. Tired of having to explain herself.

Maybe this isn’t surprising. For the Indian writer and, more recently, activist (not a word she likes to use about herself, but an accurate one nonetheless) is three years into a journey which began back in 1997 with the publication of her debut novel The God of Small Things, and which has since sent her in directions she probably never expected to travel, for reasons she is still trying to make clear.

https://www.paulkingsnorth.net/roy